“My experience in athletics at MCP allowed me to cultivate leadership skills, to develop an understanding of commitment and to value teamwork. I continue to use these values and skills as I play soccer for the UCLA Women's Club Soccer team.”

Hannah Palmer ’09

Course Descriptions

Read below to see a comprehensive list of all our course offerings organized by department.

Course Descriptions

English

English 9 – P
Prerequisite: None

Course Description: English 9 is a strong college preparation course that focuses on language arts skills necessary for effective communication through the combined study of the fundamentals of speech, grammar and vocabulary with an introduction to literary analysis through the study of novels, plays, poems, and short fiction. Building writing skills is a primary objective of the course with students focusing on the mechanics, usage, sentence construction, and paragraph development of the essay. In preparation for the next level(s) of the English curriculum, students learn to respond orally to literature through discussion and recitation taken from selected literary works.

World Literature – P
Prerequisite: None

Course Description: This college preparatory sophomore course is a continuation of the foundation of principles and skills learned in English 9. The World Literature course stresses mastery of rhetorical skills, as well as literary analysis. Throughout the year students will examine a great variety of authors, genres, and literary movements from a variety of time periods, focusing on a more global perspective. Emphasis will be on analyzing and critically assessing literature, enhancing skills in writing, reading, listening and note taking, discussion, and public speaking. Students will broaden their understanding of a variety of nuances in language styles through reading, writing, and discussion. Students will learn to synthesize literature as an expression of human imagination and condition, and refine their composition skills through work on thesis-supported essays in conjunction with the study of drama, poetry, mythology and the novel. Focus on vocabulary and grammar, in alignment with and preparation for the SAT and ACT exams, is a major component of the World Literature course. Students will demonstrate their research and analysis skills through a literary criticism research paper.

American Literature – P
Prerequisite: None

Course Description: Throughout the year, students in this college preparatory junior course will be exposed to a variety of American authors. Students will survey American literature from 1604 to the present, and garner a better understanding of our American cultural and literary heritage from the 17th through 20th centuries. Students will examine a wide variety of literary genres including novels, plays, and short fiction. Emphasis in this course will be on analyzing and critically assessing literature through research, composition, and discussion. The process includes the ongoing development of sophisticated listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, with a major focus on literary criticism. This is a college preparatory course and as such, students will write a variety of essays, including a formal research paper, as they focus on building the skills necessary for scholarly study in college. In addition, the American Literature course focuses on building skills in essay construction, grammar and vocabulary in alignment with and preparation for the SAT and ACT exams.

AP English Language – AP
Prerequisite: Completion of World Literature or its equivalent with a grade of B+ or higher. Department chair must approve all applicants

Course Description: AP English Language and Composition focuses on the art of rhetoric and the effective use of language. Students will study a number of celebrated writers of prose in a variety of genres - the novel, short story, autobiography, biography, satire, and the essay - in order to examine how language works to persuade, enrage, and move. Students will develop sophisticated reading and writing skills as they explore and describe how language works. Students will observe and analyze the words, patterns, and structures that create subtle effects of language. They will learn to describe language, demonstrating a working knowledge of parts of speech and structural patterns as well as an awareness of connotation and shades of meaning in context. Students will engage in extensive skill building in both grammar and vocabulary as they prepare for the SAT and ACT exams. Those students who meet the requirements of the AP exam receive college credit. The exam - which all students must take - tests a student's ability to read critically and to write in the following modes: comparison and contrast, narration / description, definition, extended definition, academic argument, and synthesis. Compositions in AP English Language focus on unified theme essays as well as the organization and writing of a formal research-driven paper. AP courses move at a faster pace and with a greater intensity than non-AP courses.

British Literature – P
Prerequisite: None

Course Description: British Literature is a college preparatory senior course that focuses on literature generated in Britain from 55 AD to the present. Through the examination of a great variety of British authors, genres, and literary movements, students will garner a better understanding of British culture and literature, and become critically aware of the evolution of British literature and its far-reaching effects. Students will spend the year dissecting / analyzing novels, plays, and collections of poetry from, in terms of both content and structure. Emphasis in this course will be on analyzing and critically assessing literature through research, composition, and discussion, as well as the ongoing development of sophisticated listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. By the end of the year, students will have a thorough understanding of the tenets of the literary movements, as well as each movement’s evolution, and the skills necessary for the level of expectation they will find in college. In addition to reading, analyzing, and annotating literary works, all seniors will write at least one college essay as part of the senior English curriculum.

AP English Literature – AP
Prerequisite: Completion of American Literature or its equivalent with a grade of A- or higher, or
AP English Language with a grade of B or higher. Department chair must approve all applicants.

Course Description: The skills and concepts of Advanced Placement English Literature are complex and challenging. Students in the AP English Lit senior course are required to demonstrate excellence in literary analysis, composition and discussion. This course guides, as well as engages, students in the careful reading and critical analysis of various works of literature. The year is spent dissecting novels, plays, and collections of poetry that vary in length, theme, time period, subject matter, and genre in preparation for the AP English Literature exam.  As they read, students will consider a work's structure, style, and themes as well as smaller-scale elements such as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Emphasis is placed on the practice of reading, writing, and analytical thinking skills in preparation for college as they look at the literature through a variety of critical lenses and articulate their findings both orally and in writing. In addition to reading, analyzing, and annotating literary works, all students in the AP English Literature course will write at least one college essay as part of the senior English curriculum. Those meeting the requirements of the AP exam receive college credit. The exam - which all students must take - tests a student's ability to read and critically analyze poetry, as well as prose. AP courses move at a faster pace and with a greater intensity than non-AP courses.

English Electives

Speak Now! The Art of Effective Speaking – P
Prerequisite: None

Course Description: This course introduces students to elements and techniques of speech writing as well as delivery in a variety of modes, and offers individual guidance on the student's development as an orator. This course provides students with an opportunity to gain self-confidence and learn successful communication skills. Students will experiment with different styles while working on strengthening their own creative deliveries as they become proficient in extemporaneous, impromptu, persuasive, and expository speaking.

Foreign Language

Spanish I
Prerequisite: None

Course Description: This class is directed to students with no or very little knowledge of Spanish. This is a communication-based course in Spanish on understanding and speaking, along with development of reading, writing, and oral communication skills. Students progress to a mastery of basic Spanish. The class requires a lot of interaction. Students will participate in several activities and orals skits that will reinforce the vocabulary and grammar rules learned in the class.  Familiarization with the Hispanic culture is included in the text and class material.

Spanish II – P
Prerequisite: Spanish I with a C- or higher or equivalent score on placement test

Course Description: Spanish II is an intermediate Spanish class. This program helps the students develop the competencies delineated in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning. This course is taught mostly in Spanish.  Students will learn Spanish through music, art, literature, games, movement, peer work, cooperative learning, homework, and of course practice. Freshmen wanting to take this class will have to take a placement test.

Spanish III – P
Prerequisite: Spanish II must be completed with a C- or higher.

Course Description: The development of the communicative skills continues, focusing on intensive reading begun during level one and two. Besides additional oral and written exercises, composition skills are developed through drills carefully constructed to effect liberalized expression in language. The culture and civilization of the people who speak the language are studied more intensively.

Honors Advanced Spanish: Culture, Society, and History of the Hispanic World - HR
Prerequisite: Native Spanish speaker, completion of Spanish 3, or completion of AP Spanish

Course Description: This course is designed to provide practice in advanced grammatical concepts and advanced conversational skills. A variety of materials are used to achieve an advanced level of written and oral proficiency. This course is taught in Spanish.

Advanced Spanish is designed to develop advanced conversational skills. A variety of materials are used to build communication in writing and speaking. The program has a large component in audiovisual materials, like movies, documentaries, music, television programs, etc. Students learn about many different issues related with the Hispanic World, present and past.

AP Spanish – AP
Prerequisite: Honors Advanced Spanish with a grade of C+ or higher, Spanish III with a grade of B or higher, and department chair approval.

Course Description: This course is designed for self-motivated students committed to serious study in Spanish. A prescribed course of study including advanced grammar topics, advanced listening comprehension exercises, advanced reading comprehension exercises, and advanced spoken practice will be presented in order to prepare the student for the Advanced Placement Exam. College credit may be awarded on the basis of the evaluation and the particular colleges' or universities' policies. This course focuses on the development of conversational skills. Grammar is taught only as a vehicle for building basic communication skills in speaking and writing. A variety of materials including text, magazines, internet, newspapers, television, video and audiocassettes are used to achieve a basic level of oral proficiency. The College Board guidelines will be followed. The course is taught entirely in Spanish.

Latin I – P
Prerequisite: None

Course Description: Latin I is designed to provide beginning level secondary students with a learning experience in a classical language. The students will learn about the culture of the Roman people as well as develop cultural insights through the readings and translations they will study. Students will develop reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills in the Latin language. The learning of selected Latin songs will be used to heighten the students’ pronunciation, understanding and enjoyment of the language. Grammatical importance will be learned as students encounter it in their study. The study of Latin will enhance student’s ability to learn language in the following ways:

1. the recognition of word roots related to Latin vocabulary

2. a greater understanding of English grammar.

3. a broader knowledge of English through the study of Latin vocabulary

4. a greater facility in the learning of other languages through the discipline of learning Latin.

Latin III - HR               
Prerequisite: Latin II with a grade of C- or higher

Course Description:  Latin 3 is a course designed to transition the student from the composed Latin in the first two courses to the reading and understanding of the authentic writings of well-known Latin authors. The study of these writing begins with those of the historian Eutropius in the year 64 B.C. and concludes with a selection of the writings of Pliny ad Petronius, two authors of the first century A.D.

Mathematics

Algebra Foundations
Prerequisite: None

The Algebra Foundations course is to serve as a bridge between elementary mathematics and Algebra.  Students will extend their elementary skills and begin to learn algebra concepts that serve as a transition into formal Algebra and Geometry. This course will build a foundation of algebraic ideas through the use of direct instruction, technology, manipulatives, problem solving, and cooperative learning.  Concepts include arithmetic review, algebraic expressions, linear equations, polynomials, factoring, inequalities, geometry, statistics, and graphing.  Problem solving, reasoning, estimation, and connections between math and everyday applications will be emphasized throughout Algebra Foundations.  The course focuses on developing fluency with rational numbers and proportional relationships. This course is designed to prepare students for Algebra I.

Algebra I – P
Prerequisite: Math 8 or Pre-Algebra

Course Description: Algebra I at Mission College Prep is a rigorous and complete course of study. It is the foundation course for ALL high school and college mathematics. It is a course for students who have never had an Algebra I course, as well as students who have taken a course without success. Students who barely eked by in an Algebra I course in middle school should seriously consider taking this course to build that foundation for the future.

This course focuses on an emphasis of on writing, solving, and graphing linear and quadratic  equations.  The ability to communicate mathematical reasoning and understanding will be incorporated into all math topics.  In addition, algebraic skills and concepts are developed and used in a wide variety of problem solving situations.  Students will master these concepts giving a firm foundation for further study in mathematics. This course provides an understanding of integers and rational numbers, expressions and equations, linear equations and inequalities in one and two variables, writing and modeling linear functions, solving linear systems, using exponents, functions and their graphs: exponential, piecewise, absolute value and quadratic, solving quadratic equations and statistics.

Geometry – P
Prerequisite: Algebra I with a grade of C or higher

Course Description: Geometry at Mission College Prep is a traditional course in that it includes a substantial amount of proofs that are often foreign and difficult for many students, but which will develop a maturity in mathematical thinking and logic in general. First semester will require mastery of vocabulary, axioms, and theorems in order to use them in proofs. Constructions are also explored during the first semester.  The second semester will require significant computations involving algebra in studying right triangles, circles, areas and volumes of two- and three-dimensional figures.  Students who earned an A in Algebra I and who understand that the homework load will be double, may take Algebra II and Geometry concurrently.

Algebra II – P
Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra I. A grade of C or higher in Geometry is required for college preparatory Algebra II

Course Description: Emphasizes acquiring and improving facility with the tools of algebra that will take a student from lower mathematics to higher mathematics with such new topics as conic sections, exponential/logarithmic functions, polynomial functions, graphing transformations, inverse functions, rational functions, complex numbers, probability, and sequences/series. The course also reviews skills learned in Algebra I with more depth. A graphing calculator (preferentially a TI-83 or TI-84) is required equipment for Algebra II. Students learn graphing calculator skills important to subsequent math courses.

Honors Algebra II – HR
Prerequisite: A grade of B or higher in Geometry and completion of Algebra I. 
*Does not count as Honors for UC/CSU GPA calculation

Course Description:  This course differs in breadth and depth from the regular Algebra II course.  It is significantly more challenging, and it goes at a faster pace; the course assumes that there is no need for a review of Algebra I skills.  However, when review concepts appear in the exercises, they are presented more in depth (linear equations, algebraic expressions, order of operations, inequalities, absolute values, word problems, graphing of linear equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and inequalities, factoring, rational expressions, and solving quadratic equations).  The course provides an understanding of functions and relations, matrices, graphing quadratic equations (conic sections), solving and graphing polynomials of degree 2 or more, irrational and complex numbers, solving and graphing rational equations, solving and graphing exponential and logarithmic equations, sequences and series, and some trigonometric functions, applications, and graphing.  Finally, this course teaches the uses and applications of the graphing calculator which are required for all students in Algebra II. (We will be demonstrating with the TI-84 plus.)  Students who earned an A in Algebra I and who understand that the homework load will be double, may take Algebra II concurrently with Geometry. However a minimum of a B must be maintained at each marking period or the student will have to drop Algebra II.

Math Analysis - P
Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Algebra II

Course Description: Math Analysis is a rigorous semester course in mathematics. Algebra II topics (conic sections, exponential/logarithmic functions, polynomials functions, graphing transformations, inverse functions, rational functions, complex numbers, probability, sequences/series, and polar graphing) are reintroduced with more depth and as a form of review for college.  Mastery of a graphing calculator is imperative for success in this course.

Trigonometry – P
Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Algebra II.

Course Description:  Trigonometry is a rigorous semester course in mathematics. It doesn't go as fast or as in-depth as Honors Pre-calculus, but it is still a very demanding course with an amazing amount of memorization and understanding. It is assumed that the student has a fair foundation in Algebra II to succeed in this course. The course will prepare a student for the trigonometry he or she needs to succeed in fields like surveying, architecture, etc. and also, for fields that require calculus.  Basic trigonometric topics (triangular, unit circle, and verifications) and trigonometric topics such as polar graphing, trigonometric forms of complex numbers will also be introduced.  Mastery of a graphing calculator is imperative for success in this course.

Honors Precalculus – HR
Prerequisite: A grade of B or higher in Honors Algebra II or an A in college preparatory Algebra II. 

Course Description:  Honors Pre-calculus is definitely a rigorous course in mathematics.
A student who takes this course must be aware of the rigor and fast pace. Therefore, the student must have a well-founded foundation in Algebra II to succeed in this course. The course includes within it, an in-depth course in Trigonometry. At least one semester is spent introducing and working with trigonometry (triangular, unit circle, and verifications), and the rest of the course going into Algebra II topics with much more depth and breadth (conic sections, exponential/logarithmic functions, polynomials functions, graphing transformations, inverse functions, rational functions, complex numbers, probability, sequences/series, and polar graphing). There is a significant amount of memorization in this course. This memorization is imperative in order for the student to be successful in this course and to master high-level problems. This course prepares students for success in calculus. Mastery of a graphing calculator is imperative for success in this course.

Calculus – P
Prerequisite: Trigonometry and Math Analysis or Honors Pre-calculus. 

Course Description:  Calculus is a first year calculus course.  Some of the topics covered include limits, continuity, derivatives, applications of derivatives (related rates, curve-sketching, optimization), integrals, applications of integrals (volumes, accumulation of change, differential equations), and techniques of integration. Mastery of a graphing calculator is imperative for success in this course.

AP Calculus AB – AP
Prerequisite: A grade of B or higher in Honors Pre-calculus or an A in Trig/Math Analysis.

Course Description:  AP Calculus is a college course taught in high school. Hence, the homework load is heavier than a high school course, and the students must work more independently than in other math courses. AP Calculus AB is a challenging in-depth study of functions, graphs, limits, derivatives, definite integrals, antiderivatives, and real-world applications of differentiation and antidifferentiation.  Students will work with functions graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally and understand the connections among these representations.  Some of the topics covered include limits, continuity, derivatives, applications of derivatives (rates of change, rectilinear motion, related rates, curve-sketching, optimization), integrals, applications of integrals (area, volumes, accumulation of change, differential equations), and techniques of integration. Mastery of a graphing calculator is imperative for success in this course.

AP Calculus BC – AP
Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB with a grade of B or higher and completion of Trigonometry and Math Analysis or Honors Pre-calculus.

Course Description:  AP Calculus is a college course taught in high school. Hence, the homework load is heavier than a high school course, and the students must work more independently than in other math courses. The material is difficult and demanding; it entails mastery of content and critical thinking. AP Calculus BC is an extension of topics learned in Calculus AB.  It also introduces the Calculus of polar and parametric equations, series (power, Taylor, MacLaurin, convergence), and new methods of integration. Mastery of a graphing calculator is imperative for success in this course.

AP Statistics – AP
Prerequisite: Algebra II, with a minimum grade of C or higher, and upon recommendation of their previous math teacher

Course Description: This is a course for juniors and seniors. The purpose of the Advanced Placement course in Statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The topics for AP Statistics are divided into four major themes: exploratory data analysis, planning a study, probability, and statistical inference. AP Stats covers the same material as a one semester introductory course in Statistics at the university level. The syllabus for AP Stats is approved by the College Board.

A graphing calculator (preferably a TI-83 or TI-84) is required equipment for AP Statistics, since the AP syllabus emphasizes use of technology. Students who are intending to major in mathematics, engineering, business, physical, life, or social sciences could benefit greatly from taking AP Stats since it is likely they will be required to take an introductory statistics class as part of their college major. As well, professionals in these areas make use of, or encounter statistics in their jobs.

Math Electives

AP Computer Science Principles – AP
Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 with a C or better

Course Description: Computer Science Principles (CSP) is a new Advanced Placement course designed to give students foundational computing skills, an understanding of the real-world impact of computing applications, and programming literacy. It is a course seeking to broaden participation in computing and computer science by students who might not otherwise consider studying the subject.  The course is organized around the 7 “big ideas” in computer science: abstraction, algorithms, creativity, data, impact, internet, and programming.

Religious Studies

Hebrew Scriptures – P
Prerequisite: None

Course Description: Hebrew Scriptures is a one semester course that provides the student with a basic understanding of the Hebrew Scriptures through two components. The first component will focus on the historical and cultural situation of the Ancient Hebrew people. The course brings the student into a mindful dialogue with the Bible as it recorded and affected the history and faith of the ancient Israelite people. The second component will be interactive, focusing on the formational and transformational levels.  This component will be driven by historical-critical Catholic Biblical interpretation techniques and a study of Senses of Scripture.  Students will be challenged to seek inspired wisdom through the allegorical, moral and anagogical senses of these stories.  The course begins with exploring the individual student's background and religious foundations as his or her personal sacred story, and continues to connect the Judeo-Christian sacred story, the Scriptures, with the individual's story. The expected learning results are that a student begins or continues the process of growth as a faith-filled person, develops towards spiritual maturity, and begins to envision a life in service to the community working toward justice. Students of all faiths and philosophical world views are welcome in this course and are encouraged to share openly and respectfully about their experiences, traditions and beliefs.  All students, regardless of background, will benefit with an increased appreciation for the Christian tradition, as well as a deeper introspection to God’s fundamental call to relationship with God.                

Christian Scriptures – P
Prerequisite: None

Course Description: Christian Scriptures is a one semester course which provides the student with a basic understanding of the Christian Scriptures through two components. The first component will focus on an historical level. The second component will be interactive, focusing on the formational and transformational levels. The course brings the student into a mindful dialogue with the Bible as it recorded and affected the history of Christian people.  Emphasis is placed on the Incarnation, message and ministry of Jesus Christ, and Paschal Mystery, as the fulfillment of God’s perfect love.  Student formation is emphasized through the invitation of Jesus Christ to actively build God’s Reign through a commitment to loving and justice-minded action.  The expected learning results are that a student begins or continues the process of growth as a faith-filled person, develops towards spiritual maturity, and becomes increasingly committed to a life in service to the community working toward justice. Students of all faiths and philosophical world views are welcome in this course and are encouraged to share openly and respectfully about their experiences, traditions and beliefs.  All students, regardless of background, will benefit with an increased appreciation for the Christian tradition, as well as a deeper introspection to God’s fundamental call to relationship with God.            

Sacraments and the Sacramental Life
Prerequisite: Christian Scriptures. Sacraments in the Sacramental Life is the 3rd course in the sequence of religion courses at MCP.

Course Description: Sacraments and the Sacramental Life is a one semester course that will cover the history and theology of the sacraments of the Catholic Church, as well as an evaluation of the ideas that shaped Catholic understanding of the sacraments throughout the centuries. Students will become acquainted with the scriptural basis for the seven sacraments within the historical and social context of Jesus’ time, and how the Church’s understanding of the sacraments has developed through the centuries. Expected learning results are that students will develop a theological and philosophical vocabulary to properly articulate these ideas, and a deeper understanding of their own identities and the call to know God, to love God, and to share in God’s divine life. The study of each sacrament will be enriched with an examination of the life of a man or woman who exemplifies particular character traits and graces associated with the sacrament.  The class will critically analyze the person’s life, faith and legacy.  Students will learn valuable lessons on how to live a faith-filled life for others, and develop a greater understanding and appreciation for other cultures.  Students will develop the ability to critically evaluate text and film via analytical written reflection.  Students of all faiths and philosophical world views are welcome in this course and are encouraged to share openly and respectfully about their experiences, traditions and beliefs.  All students, regardless of background, will benefit with an increased appreciation for the Christian tradition, as well as a deeper introspection to God’s fundamental call to relationship with God.             

Ethics, Virtues, and the Human Person – P
Prerequisite: Sacraments in the Sacramental Life. Ethics, Virtues, and the Human Person is the 4th course in the sequence of religion courses at MCP.

Course Description: Ethics, Virtues, and the Human Person is a one semester course that focuses on the study of key aspects of Ethics (Moral Philosophy) and Moral Theology. Students analyze the stages of moral development and reflect upon the development of conscience by examining personal and social moral actions and decision-making. The basis for the course is the Christian belief that the natural law guides human beings toward the good, and that Jesus reveals how we should live and is the model of the Christian moral life. Expected learning results are that students will develop self-examination skills, background knowledge of both moral theory and its application that will enhance their ability to grow in virtue and do the good. Students of all faiths and philosophical world views are welcome in this course and are encouraged to share openly and respectfully about their experiences, traditions and beliefs.  All students, regardless of background, will benefit with an increased appreciation for the Christian tradition, as well as a deeper introspection to God’s fundamental call to relationship with God.            

Catholic Social Justice
Prerequisite: Ethics, Virtues, and the Human Person. Catholic Social Justice is the 5th course in the sequence of religion courses at MCP.

Course Description: In this one semester course, students apply the teachings and actions of Jesus Christ and His Church to the policies, structures, and institutions of our modern world.  Under the direction of biblical teachings and the Church’s Social Teaching, students learn to recognize injustices, examine the causes, and actively participate in addressing issues through service learning.  Catholic Social Teaching encourages students to develop a vision of the world that unites all people under the core truth of inherent human dignity, and motivates students to create a loving change in our world. Students of all faiths and philosophical world views are welcome in this course and are encouraged to share openly and respectfully about their experiences, traditions and beliefs.  All students, regardless of background, will benefit with an increased appreciation for the Christian tradition, as well as a deeper introspection to God’s fundamental call to relationship with God.           

Religions of Our World
Prerequisite: Catholic Social Justice. Religions of Our World is the 6th course in the sequence of religion courses at MCP.

Course Description: This one semester course is an introductory survey of some of the major religious traditions of the world, exploring how the Catholic Church recognizes and values the respective truths found in these traditions, united in the common identity of Children of God, made in God’s image.  Seven dimensions of religious traditions will be highlighted: experiential, mythic, doctrinal, ethical, ritual, social and material. Teaching methodologies will include theoretical survey accompanied with experiential learning by guest presenters and field experience opportunities.  The aim of this course is to invite the student to critically engage with the wisdom of the world’s major religions in order to equip him or her for mutual understanding and respectful dialogue with others, crucial factors for globally responsible citizenship and establishing and maintaining peace and justice in the world. Students of all faiths and philosophical world views are welcome in this course and are encouraged to share openly and respectfully about their experiences, traditions and beliefs.  All students, regardless of background, will benefit with an increased appreciation for these tradition, as well as a deeper introspection to God’s fundamental call to relationship with God.           

Faith and Reason
Prerequisite: Religions of Our World. Faith and Reason is the 7th course in the sequence of religion courses at MCP.

Course Description: The purpose for the year long course Faith and Reason is best summarized by Saint Paul’s prayer in his letter to the Ephesians:

“For this reason I bow my knees before the Father, from whom every family in heaven and on earth derives its name, that He would grant you, according to the riches of His glory, to be strengthened with the power through His Spirit in the inner man, so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith; and that you, being rooted and grounded in love, may be able to comprehend with all the saints what is the breadth and length and height and depth, and to know the love of Christ which surpasses knowledge, that you may be filled up to all the fullness of God.” –Ephesians 3:14-19

Faith and Reason seeks to increase students’ faith not solely by exploring reason-based arguments on matters of Catholic belief, but also through a deeper emotional awareness of God’s presence in our lives and the world.  Students are challenged to experience the fullness of God using the intellect (the head) and the intuitive (the heart).  The complexity of material studied increases compared to other religion courses as students engage in critical analysis of works including: philosophical texts, essays, fictional stories, poetry, art, and film.  Challenging classroom dialogue supports students to build a stronger foundation for mature faith.  Students of all faiths and philosophical world views are welcome in this course and are encouraged to share openly and respectfully about their experiences, traditions and beliefs.  All students, regardless of background, will benefit with an increased appreciation for the Christian tradition, as well as a deeper introspection to God’s fundamental call to relationship with God.          

Science  

Biology – P
Prerequisite: None

Course Description:   This course covers the basic concepts of the life sciences. Students are introduced to the scientific method, cell biology, metabolism, human body systems, genetics, evolution, and ecology. Lab work is important and will give the student a "hands-on" experience with the topics being covered. Individual and group projects will also be used in assessment.         

Health
Prerequisites: None

Course Description: Health is required of incoming freshmen. The students examine major health topics including interpersonal communication skills, decision-making skills, goal setting skills, psychology, drug and alcohol awareness, first aid, human anatomy, nutrition, and fitness awareness. Physical, mental, emotional, spiritual, environmental, and social health are all addressed in this one semester course.             

Physics – P
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and completion of Algebra I

Course Description: Physics is all about the world we live in! We study how and why things work, from sound and light to effects of solids, liquids, and gases, to motion and forces affecting everyday objects and even the universe. A conceptual approach is used in this year-long laboratory science. Light, sound and waves, behavior of solid, fluid and gaseous matter, and study of motion and forces are covered. Common misconceptions are identified and explained. Students continue to develop their technical writing abilities on lab and project reports throughout this class. Project work such as designing and building rockets, catapults, hovercrafts, or Rube Goldberg machines is an essential component of the class.

Honors Physics – HR
Prerequisite: Geometry with a B+ or higher.  Concurrent enrollment in Honors Algebra II or higher.

Course Description: Honors Physics is a challenging, algebra-based, year-long laboratory course for mathematically-prepared sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Learning occurs through lecture, labs, homework problems, class demonstrations, writing, and projects. Light, sound and waves, basic electricity, and kinematics are covered at a much deeper level with more complex mathematical problem solving than the basic Physics class. Concepts are investigated in college-level labs requiring electronic data acquisition, significant reasoning, and development of mathematical problem-solving abilities. Group project work such as designing sustainable buildings, building catapults or Rube Goldberg machines is an essential component. Honors Physics provides valuable preparation for students planning to take AP Physics C - Mechanics by introducing physics terminology, reasoning, conceptual understanding, and providing introductory work.

Comments: This class is for highly motivated students with high mathematical aptitude. It is well suited for students who desire to major in engineering, math, science, or technology in college. It is taught with a problem-solving approach in both one and two dimensions, requiring a solid algebra and geometry foundation.

Chemistry – P
Prerequisite: Completion or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II recommended, but not required.

Course Description: Chemistry is the study of materials, their composition and properties and the changes they undergo. This course will cover the basic facts and concepts of inorganic chemistry, preparing students for a college chemistry course. There will be nightly reading, problems and assignments. The students will be challenged to independently problem solve, as well as work cooperatively. Lab work will emphasize developing lab techniques, writing clear and detailed lab reports, and integrating lab experiences with the lecture material.

Comments: The pace and additional material covered differentiate Honors Chemistry from Chemistry. For both classes, it is critical to utilize and develop a work ethic to manage the memorization and problem solving that is required.

Honors Chemistry – HR
Prerequisite: Completion or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II. Grade of B or higher in Physics recommended

Course Description: Chemistry is the study of materials, their composition and properties, and the changes they undergo. This course will cover the basic facts and concepts of inorganic chemistry, preparing students for a college chemistry course. The pace will be brisk, with nightly reading, problems, and assignments. The students will be challenged to independently problem solve, as well as work cooperatively. Students are required to be enrolled in Algebra II, Trigonometry, or Calculus. An understanding of graphing is expected, particularly graphing of data and linear/inverse regression. Tests cover more chapters than Chemistry and in more depth. Students are expected to study material 15 minutes to 45 minutes per day in order to keep up with the quick pace. There is a larger homework requirement with considerably less guided practice during class. Essays on tests require more synthesis and analysis. Lab work will emphasize developing lab techniques, writing clear and detailed lab reports, and integrating lab experiences with the lecture material.

Comments: The pace and additional material covered differentiate Honors Chemistry from Chemistry. For both classes, it is critical to utilize and develop a work ethic to manage the memorization and problem solving that is required.

Honors Chemistry II – HR
Prerequisite: Junior with concurrent enrollment in core science classes or senior with concurrent or completion of core science classes. Completion of Honors Chemistry with a grade B+ or higher, or completion of Chemistry with an A grade is recommended but not required. Also, concurrent enrollment in or successful completion of Algebra II.

Course Description: This course continues the Honors Chemistry curriculum. Second year chemistry will conduct an extended laboratory and provide an in-depth investigation of specialized areas of chemistry. Areas of study include advanced acid-base equilibrium, organic chemistry, biochemistry, electrochemistry, oxidation-reduction, and qualitative analysis. The SAT subject exam in Chemistry may be considered upon completion of the course. Students will be introduced to college chemistry topics not ordinarily introduced until sophomore or junior years in college. A goal of the class is to develop confidence in students in order for them to consider a science major when applying to college.

Comments: This class is open for both students who have completed Chemistry and Honors Chemistry. The material is college level, but at a pace that can allow for mastery.

Science Electives

AP Physics C – P
Prerequisite: Junior with concurrent enrollment in core science classes or senior with concurrent/completion of core science classes. Completion of Honors Precalculus with a grade B+ or higher or completion of Trig/Math Analysis with an A grade. Concurrent enrollment in AP Calculus is strongly recommended.

Course Description:  AP Physics is appropriate for students with strong math skills interested in the science, engineering, math, and medical professions.  It is a full-year laboratory physics course, taught at the college level.   The class covers the recommended content for AP Physics C - Mechanics, including Newton’s Laws, kinematics, work & energy, momentum, circular motion and angular momentum.  Mathematical and graphical analysis using trigonometry and beginning calculus are emphasized.  Laboratory work is required, and a lab notebook should be kept to document your work.  Outside mechanical projects such as building catapults, hovercrafts, Rube Goldberg machines extend classroom learning.  Lecture and problem solving take 80% of the course hours and labs take 20% of the time.  All students must take the AP Physics C - Mechanics exam.  After the AP test, the class usually concludes with a trip to Magic Mountain to study roller coaster physics.

Comments: AP Physics is extremely rigorous.  It is an excellent course to take alongside AP Calculus.  Every year, students who are in both classes say that they reinforce each other, and make each course a little easier.

Electronics/Robotics
Prerequisite: Completion of one year of Physics or concurrent enrollment.

Course Description: This laboratory elective course extends/or introduces physics topics including (1) electric circuit and device theory, (2) simple mechanical devices (gears, levers, screws), torque, center of mass, force, pressure, and motion; and (3) robot programming using Python and C.   Circuits and devices are investigated both theoretically (problem solving) and by using discrete components.  Boolean algebra is used to gain insight and understand the workings of computer logic.  The course is discovery, problem solving, and activity-based.

Building and programming robot functions is introduced using VEX claw-bot kits.  Students move on to designing and building their own robots with VEX components to compete in the yearly competition.  Sensor interfaces (temperature, light, motion detectors, pressure, encoders, etc.) are investigated and programmed to work with the robot.  Electrical and mechanical safety is emphasized throughout the course.

The class participates in designing, building, and competing in both classroom and three or more regional robotics competitions, such as VEX Robotics Competition or the MATE Underwater Remote Operated Vehicle Competition.

Anatomy and Physiology - P
Prerequisite: Junior with concurrent enrollment in core science classes or senior with concurrent/completion of core science classes (offered 2017-2018, 2019-2020)
*Pending UC approval

Course Description: We each have a body and benefit from knowing how it works.  Anatomy and Physiology explores the structure and function of the human body through discussion, dissection and laboratory investigation.  Topics include biochemical composition, cells, major body systems, body system processes, maintaining homeostasis and the impacts of disease and treatment.  Students will be responsible for proper use of lab and medical equipment, lab reports and projects assigned throughout each unit.

Comments: This course is intended for students interested in pursuing biology and health/medical career choices.

AP Environmental Science (not offered next year, 2017-2018)
Prerequisite: Junior with concurrent enrollment in core science classes or senior with concurrent/completion of core science (offered 2018-2019, 2020-2021)

Course Description: AP Environmental science is designed for the student who expresses an interest in a greater understanding of natural forces as well as human interaction with and impact on the environment.  It is a full year laboratory science course, taught at the college level.  The themes of the course include an under of the process of science, energy conversions underlie ecological processes, the Earth is one interconnected system, humans alter natural systems, and environmental problems have a cultural and social context.

Laboratory and field investigations comprise 20% or more of the class time.  Possible investigations include water and soil samples, conducting long-term studies on a local ecosystem or environmental problem, analyzing real data sets, and visiting local public facilities such as a water-treatment plant. These investigations are designed to allow the students to test the concepts and principles introduced in the lecture portion.

Comments: This course is designed to prepare students to take the AP Environmental Science test.

Social Studies

World Geography - P - one semester course (5 credits)
Prerequisite: None

Course Description: While many people think Geography is simply about maps, this course will prove that an incorrect assumption by examining the two main aspects of geography- physical and human geography, with a special focus on how the two affect one another. After an initial examination of the central themes to geography, the course will explore many of the earth's regions to better understand the different ways that people are living throughout the world today and the reasons for those differences. We will take a special look at both the ways the earth affects how people live and how the ways that people live affect the earth. The ultimate goal of this class is to take a look at our world that helps us appreciate the world outside of San Luis Obispo or the Central Coast and to better understand and value the differences among the people of our world. Another goal is to encourage students to pay more attention to what is happening in both their local and global community to become more responsible citizens.   

World History – P
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Course Description: World History has a Western Civilization focus and surveys the Ancient Civilization era up to the mid-20th century. The course is designed to provide an appreciation for the contributions made by different societies and individuals throughout history. The main themes of the course include empire building, migration, globalization, world religions, disease and history, technology, and revolutions. Some topics include the Age of Exploration, the French Revolution and nation-building, the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution and Age of Imperialism, the causes, courses and consequences of the First and Second World Wars, the post-WWII era and the Cold War.

AP World History – P
Prerequisite: World Geography with a grade of B+ or higher and/or approval from the instructor.

Course Description: AP World History is a college-level course offered to high school students. Offered at the 10th grade level, this college level course is almost sure to be the most difficult course students have ever encountered. The homework load is heavier than a typical high school course, the students must work more independently than in other history courses, and the material requires a level of analytical thinking higher than what is generally expected in high school courses. Unlike other classes, much of the focus is on skills and strategies, often more than the "content" of the textbook. The course covers a huge scope (the last 10,000 years of the entire world!), and the pace of the class is very fast. The course will involve a great deal of document analysis and essay practice, focusing on historical comparisons and changes over time. As defined by the College Board, the course examines six themes of history- 1) the causes and effects of change and continuity over time, 2) the patterns and effects of interaction between societies, 3) demographic and environmental effects of historical developments, 4) social and gender structures, 5) cultural, religious, and intellectual developments, and 6) the changing nature of political organizations. The AP exam is a requirement of the course, and many colleges and universities will issue credit depending on the score earned on the exam.

US History – P
Prerequisite: Junior standing

Course Description: United States History covers the period from colonial times to the present. The course will explore the major events and crises to understand how the United States has reached our current identity and position in the world. It is designed to help students acquire a knowledge of and appreciation for the contribution and sacrifices made by various individuals and groups throughout our nation's history. Students will develop the ability to research information, process it, and present it in an organized fashion. The course is meant to help students better understand how and why the country took its course to arrive at its present state.

AP US History – P 
Prerequisite: World History with a grade of B+ or higher or A.P. World History with a grade of C+ or higher and/or approval of the instructor.

Course Description: Advanced Placement United States History surveys pre-Columbian Americas up to the present. The course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of U.S. history and to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. history. Students should learn to analyze and interpret primary and secondary historical records, read maps, graphs and tabular data related to historical events, debate and discuss major historical questions and formulate and defend substantive theses based on their knowledge of U.S. history. All students are expected to become active learners who explore ideas and issues by developing logical and critical thought skills and are able to present these ideas in a precise and personal style in both written and oral expression. The students should develop the ability to research information, process it, and present it in an organized fashion. Students are expected to read, process, and retain a great deal of material from a higher level textbook. The AP exam is a requirement of the course, and many colleges and universities will issue credit depending on the score earned on the exam.

Economics – P
Prerequisite: US History (or AP US History)

Course Description: The semester long course is designed to provide an appreciation for economic laws and the way that economic decisions are made. The course covers both micro & macroeconomics -- looking at economic decisions made by individual economic actors and the interaction between these actors, especially including the government of the United States.  Students will gain an understanding of the "language" of economics and how the decisions we make as consumers and producers affect a mixed capitalist economic system. Students will be able to critique the mixed capitalist system and how it compares to managed, socialist and traditional economic systems. We will also examine the securities and commodities markets, the relationship between consumer demand and producer supply, and marketing strategies. Lastly, the course will evaluate modern industrial economies in light of the concepts of social justice and social responsibility. A research paper is required.

American Government – P
Prerequisite: US History (or AP US History)

Course Description: This semester long course provides an overview of the structure and actual workings of local, state, and national governments in the United States. It is designed to provide an appreciation for the way that political decisions are made and interact in the United States. All students are expected to become active learners who explore ideas and issues by developing logical and critical thought skills and are able to present this in a precise and personal style in both written and oral expression. A research paper is required. The students should develop the ability to research information, process it, and present it in an organized fashion. Most topics are covered through careful readings, followed by a lecture and/or classroom discussion on the material. Videos, supplementary readings, and student research projects are occasionally used to enrich topics. Analysis of current events through the news media, political cartoons and editorials, and news "pundit" shows are also used. The ultimate goal of the course is to help students understand why our country is structured the way it is in order to have more informed opinions and to become active citizens able to make rational social justice decisions.

Social Studies Electives

AP Human Geography – P
Prerequisites: World Geography and a B or higher in English, and/or approval from the instructor

Course Description: In the words of the College Board who designs AP courses: “The purpose of the AP Human Geography course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice.” This class is about how and why people live as they do and about the reasons for the differences in how and why people live as they do in different places. After an introductory unit on the nature and perspectives of Geography, the course will follow a thematic rather than regional approach to human existence in the twenty-first century. Units will cover populations, cultural patterns and processes, political organization of space, agricultural and rural land use, industrialization and economic development, cities and urban land use, and globalization.

Visual and Performing Arts - all the following classes are electives

Art 1 – P
Prerequisites: None

Course Description: The main focus in Art 1 is to understand the role of art in our culture and how artists create art. Throughout the year, students investigate famous works of art and try to understand what the artist’s world and life was like at the time that she/he did the work. Likewise, students create art in the style of many artists using a wide range of media—drawing, painting, collage, calligraphy, etc. The study of basic design principles reinforces concepts in composition and self-expression. Assignments encourage students to stretch themselves creatively, to learn how to truly brainstorm, and to learn how to stay organized while completing multi-day projects. Emphasis is given on the importance of craftsmanship and the critical skill of paying attention to details.

Art 2 – P
Prerequisite: Art 1

Course Description: Art 2 is a two-semester course for intermediate art students that builds on the ideas and skills learned in Art 1. Students create a wide range of art in a variety of media—drawing, painting, collage, calligraphy, sculpture, printmaking, and mixed media, etc. Students are encouraged to create work that expresses their individuality. Additionally, design principles and color theory are emphasized throughout the year. Students become familiar with how these concepts were used in art history, exploring the way individual expression in the visual arts has been an important aspect in world cultures throughout history.

Art 3 – P
Prerequisite: Art 2

Course Description: Art 3 is a two-semester course for advanced art students that builds on the ideas and skills learned in Art 2. In consultation with the instructor, students create a wide range of self-assigned projects across a broad range of media. Students are expected to create work that expresses their individuality. Additionally, advanced design principles and color theory are emphasized throughout the year. Students continue their exploration of how these concepts were used in art history, exploring the way individual expression in the visual arts has been an important aspect in world cultures throughout history.

AP Studio Art – P
Prerequisite:  Art 2

Course Description: The main focus in AP Studio Art is to create two portfolios of college-level work that demonstrate understanding of 2D design concepts by using the Elements of Art (line, shape, form, space, value, color, and texture) and Principles of Design (balance, contrast, emphasis, figure/ground, movement, pattern,  rhythm/variety, scale/proportion, and unity). The Breadth portfolio consists of 12 works (submitted digitally) that utilize the Elements and Principles across a wide range of media. The Concentration portfolio consists of 12 works (submitted digitally) that explore a visual idea across the body of work created during the spring semester. From these two portfolios, five works will be selected for the Quality portfolio—which is sent to the College Board for an evaluation of craftsmanship. After the completion of 24 separate works, students may substitute advanced works created in previous years if the substitution strengthens the portfolio. Course may be repeated a second year with an emphasis on drawing and painting instead of 2D design.

Drama 1 – P
Prerequisites: None

Course Description: Each Drama Course, 1 and 2, are two-semester courses that survey the fundamental principles of acting and stagecraft.  The class provides a strong foundation in acting including projection, diction and the execution of a role and a scene.  Students will explore self-expression with the use of these acting elements and principles. The student will become aware of theatre history, exploring the way individual expression in the monologue, song and dance.  The collaborative aspects of Drama are utilized to give the student a real hands-on, theatre experience.

Drama 2 – P
Prerequisite: Drama 1

Course Description: Each Drama Course, 1 and 2, are two-semester courses that survey the fundamental principles of acting and stagecraft.  The class provides a strong foundation in acting including projection, diction and the execution of a role and a scene.  Students will explore self-expression with the use of these acting elements and principles. The student will become aware of theatre history, exploring the way individual expression in the monologue, song and dance.  The collaborative aspects of Drama are utilized to give the student a real hands-on, theatre experience.

Music Performance – P
Prerequisites: None

Course Description: This course is designed to give the student a well-rounded musical experience in a performing ensemble.  Students will be exposed to the basic elements of music as well as a variety of musical styles and methods of learning. There is also a music appreciation segment where we look at the lives and times of famous musicians and composers from the classics to the present: J. S. Bach to Tupac Shakur. They will embark on the path of developing music literacy, analysis, and interpretive skills.  Students will grow in their ability to express themselves creatively as they become more confident with their instruments both individually and collectively.  Performances will be scheduled as the ensemble develops.

Music Performance 2
Prerequisite: Music Performance 1

Course Description: This course allows the advancing student to hone their ukulele skills or choose a new instrument. One of their responsibilities will be to mentor Music 1 students on the ukulele and therefore lead a small group. The study of music theory will continue through books 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 respectively. Exploring composition utilizing their theory knowledge is also an area of study they will pursue. In the music appreciation segment, the student will be given research assignments taking them deeper into the lives, history and genre being studied. There is more independence and self-motivation expected.

The Royal Guard Band
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Course Description: The Royal Guard is a performing group of traditional band instruments. We are a spirited thread in the fabric that is the MCP community, performing at athletic events, assemblies and local community events such as the opening day game of The San Luis Blues baseball team.  Though it helps if you have prior experience on an instrument it is not necessary. Many students learn to play their first instrument as part of the band with the help of the teacher and skilled student mentors.

Digital Photography & Design – P
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or higher

Course Description: This course is an introduction to basic digital photographic techniques, computer management, and print/web presentation. Students learn the basics of camera operation including exposure, depth of field, and photographic vision. They apply the principles of design and composition to various forms of photography including artistic, documentary, photojournalism, and studio. Digital photographic techniques are employed using Adobe Lightroom software. Projects will be presented in a diverse range of print and electronic media—with many being featured in the studio gallery. Critical thinking and writing are also a central focus of the class. For each genre explored, students will study and analyze the works of relevant historical and contemporary artists working in photography and other visual arts. Each semester culminates in a final project designed by the student and approved by the instructor that explores one of the presented genres at a higher level. Many assignments can be shot on mobile phone cameras. Others require a digital, single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera, which may be checked out from the art studio.

Advanced Photography – P
Prerequisite: Digital Photography & Design

Course Description: In Advanced Photography, students build upon the artistic and technical skills learned during its prerequisite—Digital Photography & Design. Working in both digital and analog media, students create a significant portfolio that spans many photographic genres, including: street photography, light painting, environmental portraits, the portrayal of motion, crafting light and shadow with modifiers, abstraction, assembling multiple images into one image, and stringing a series of still images together into a time-lapse movie. These projects serve as means for students to continue developing their artistic perception and express themselves creatively. Projects will be presented in a diverse range of print and electronic media—with many being featured in the studio gallery. Critical thinking and writing are also a central focus of the class. For each genre explored, students will study and analyze the works of relevant historical and contemporary artists working in photography and other visual arts. Each semester culminates in a final project designed by the student and approved by the instructor that explores one of the presented genres at a higher level. Students must have a digital, single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera that is capable of shooting RAW files.

Cinematography – P
Prerequisites: None

Course Description: Students learn to make short movies in a variety of genres: documentary, dramatic, how-to, experimental, time lapse, public service announcement, etc. Simple projects will be shot on cell phones and sports cameras. More complex projects will be shot on HDSLR cameras and edited in Adobe Premiere Elements. Students explore the history and cultural role of cinematography over the past 100+ years. Critical thinking and writing are also a central focus of the class. For each genre explored, students will study and analyze the works of relevant historical and contemporary artists working in cinematography and other visual arts. Each semester culminates in a final project designed by the student and approved by the instructor that explores one of the presented genres at a higher level.

Advanced Publications: Journalism, Design and Management (Yearbook) – P
Prerequisite: Completion of 1 year of Digital Photography & Design or Intro to Journalism

Course Description: This is a publication-driven course aimed at creating an end product: the Mission Prep Yearbook. Students will photograph, interview, analyze, synthesize, and cover every school event throughout the year and work cooperatively to create a yearbook out of their captures. Those who take this course are asked to complete a summer application as well as have at least one of the prerequisites completed prior to enrolling in the course. Once enrolled, there is a minimum commitment of 3 hours of coverage work outside of school per week in order to cover all school events. Students will work hard to learn real-world time management and job-applicable skills in photography, technology, ethics, management and more.

General Electives

Leadership
Prerequisite: None, however priority will be given to students in the following order:

1.      Current ASB and Student Council Members

2.      Students who ran for ASB and Student Council during the current year

3.      Students who previously served for ASB and/or were Student Council members

4.      Students who were in Leadership in any of their previous years during high school

Course Description: This course will teach students leadership skills, including problem-solving, decision-making communication, group dynamics, time and stress management, human relations, team building, and other group processes.  The Leadership Class is an integral part of the ASB and Student Activities at MCP.  Under the ASB Constitution, Leadership implements the ideas and projects passed by the Student Council and creates proposals for the Student Council.  Much of the learning in this course is accomplished through “hands-on” experience and reflection on that experience.

Leadership Announcements
Prerequisite: None, however experience with Filming, Speech, Drama, or Technology is preferred.

Course Description: This is an elective course which provides motivated students with a hands-on introductory experience in media production. This intensive hands-on course explores public speaking, camera operation, script writing, lighting, audio production, and video editing. Students will be provided with all the basic skills necessary to produce a 5 minute video broadcast of the school’s daily bulletin.

Campus Ministry Leadership
Prerequisites: By invitation only

Course Description: This class is designed for a small group of leaders who are dedicated to the spiritual growth of our school. These individuals help organize events led by the Campus Ministry Department.

Culinary Arts
Prerequisites: None

Course Description: Culinary Arts students will learn kitchen organization, food and personal safety, basic baking techniques, menu planning, and time management through the preparation of school lunch.

Non-Credit Electives

Teacher’s Aide

Course Description: Teacher’s Aides earn credits for helping with office tasks and on campus errands. Teacher’s Aides may also be called upon by teachers for extra help they may need in their classrooms.
Note: Teacher’s Aide requests will be assessed based on available space. Teacher’s Aide is a semester course worth 5 credits.

Study Hall

Course Description: Study Hall is a zero credit course structured study environment for students who have an impacted schedule, commute to school, play a sport, or need extra support with homework.
Note: Study Hall requests will be assessed based on available space and priority will be given based on student workload. Study Hall is worth 0 credits. Study Hall is not meant to replace electives. Students should not plan on switching into a Study Hall mid-year.